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Ruark Audio R7 revealed with retro styling and wireless streaming

Tom Morgan
15 May 2013
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Does your sideboard play MP3s? This one does - Ruark's R7 sound system has plenty of retro charm and wireless streaming built-in

UK-based Ruark Audio has officially launched the R7, a 2.1 stereo system with wireless streaming, DAB radio and CD playback in a retro-inspired body that wants to take over your living room with 1960's charm.

Apparently designed around the iconic radiograms found in pre-war Britain, the R7 is a sideboard-sized statement that's made from aluminium, glass and real walnut. It weighs a considerable 30kg, and comes with a set of legs that let you use it as a piece of furniture, in case it's too heavy to fit on your TV stand.

Ruark R7

Despite the retro looks, it's fully equipped for modern music playback thanks to aptX Bluetooth and DLNA streaming, integrated Wi-Fi, DAB and internet radio and a CD player for anyone still clinging on to a physical music collection. You can also connect other devices using the two stereo analogue inputs, or the digital optical and coaxial inputs. Finally, there's a USB charge port for smartphones and tablets, to ensure you don't run out of juice when streaming.

Ruark R7

A high contrast fluorescent display lets you know what's currently playing, and you can control the system remotely using Ruark's familiar puck-shaped controller - it sits in a recessed bowl on top of the unit so you don't lose it.

Ruark R7

The 2.1 channel system consists of two 5.5in dual concentric drivers developed by Ruark and an 8in subwoofer, powered by Ruark's Class A-B amplifiers which produce 160w of power.

We had a brief chance to hear the system in action at the launch event, and were impressed by its clarity - it was easily loud enough to fill the demo room and sounded very clear and precise. Of course, we'll have to wait until the system launches to truly judge its sound quality.

The R7 will be on sale here in the UK by the autumn, but expect to pay a substantial £2,000 for the privilege of owning one.

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