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Eclipse Stealth FX812R795 Extreme review

Kat Orphanides
1 May 2012
Our Rating 
Price when reviewed 
3,140
inc VAT

If you’re in the market for the ultimate flight sim setup, this is a simply outstanding system

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Specifications

4.51GHz AMD FX-8120, 16GB RAM, 23in 1,920x1,080 display, Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit

If you're after subtlety and modest pricing, Eclipse's Stealth FX812R795 Extreme is not for you. From its pillar-box red case to its triple bank of 3D monitors and military-style Thrustmaster joystick – listed separately on Eclipse’s website as the Eclipse Stealth Flight Pack - the Stealth is built to be noticed.

The system's key audience is flight sim enthusiasts, although we don't think any gamers would be unhappy with this rig. Some assembly is required, as you have to start by attaching the monitors to an armature that allows you to pivot them for the perfect three-screen viewing angle. We'd have liked the manual for assembling the triple-screen armature to have been a little more idiot-proof, with more expanded diagrams of the how the screen mounts are clipped on to the main frame, but we got everything together and correctly positioned with a little trial and error. All three monitors come with DVI leads and a DisplayPort to DVI adapter is supplied in the box, so you can use the three screens in Eyefinity mode.

Eclipse Stealth FX812R795 Extreme

The 23in LG D2342 3D displays come with passive 3D glasses. They're not going to win any awards for raw quality - their matte screens don't oversaturate colours, but they're somewhat prone to suffering from a slight yellow or magenta cast. However, switching the screens to 3D mode eliminated the casts, as well as ramped up the brightness - turning on 3D involved some fiddling with the unlabelled monitor control buttons but isn't too tricky. The quality of the monitors' passive 3D is surprisingly good, although it's very dependent on viewing angle. The issue with viewing angles isn’t a problem if you're using the system for gaming, as the monitor stand allows you to precisely adjust the angle of each display, but could present problems if you want to watch a 3D film on one of the monitors with friends.

The system comes installed with a 3D gaming launcher and a copy of Microsoft Flight to go with your massively over-the-top Thrustmaster HOTAS Warthog flight stick and throttle array. We had to set up our monitors for AMD Eyefinity before we could play in full-screen 3D, but with that done, Flight automatically detected and expanded to fill our monitors. You can also add more games to the 3D launcher, which has built in 3D profiles for a wide range of popular titles - more can be found online via regular updates to the TriDef 3D software.

As well as playing in 3D, we ran our usual 2D 1,920x1,080 gaming tests, which produced astonishing frame rates - 86.4fps in Dirt 3 at Ultra detail and with 4x anti-aliasing, and 43.3fps in Crysis 2 at Ultra detail. We also ran the Dirt 3 test at the PC's full Eyefinity triple-screen resolution of 5,760x1,080 and got a smooth frame rate of 55.6fps. Even when playing Dirt 3 in 3D at 5,760x1,080 we still saw a playable frame rate of 37.8fps. All that performance is hardly surprising given that the Stealth's graphics are powered by two hugely powerful AMD Radeon HD 7950 graphics cards with 3GB of RAM each in a CrossFire configuration.

Eclipse Stealth FX812R795 Extreme

The PC's water-cooled processor is an eight-core "Bulldozer" AMD FX-8120, overclocked to 4.51GHz. Even with this huge overclock it still scored 100 overall in our benchmarks, which is the same as an Intel Core i5-2500K running at its stock speed. It's more than quick enough to run intensive applications and games, but, as noted in our review of the similarly eight-core FX-8150 most current applications don’t take advantage of so many cores so much of the chip's potential is wasted. This may change in the future as applications become more six- and eight-core friendly.

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