Advertisement
Advertisement

CMS Computers Zoostorm Home Media Desktop review

Kat Orphanides
21 Jun 2012
Our Rating 
Price when reviewed 
395
inc VAT

This budget PC performs well enough but we’d welcome better build quality

Advertisement

Specifications

2.8GHz AMD FX-4170, 8GB RAM, N/A display, Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit

While many people are excited about Intel's powerful new Ivy Bridge processors, not everyone needs a massively overpowered processor or the latest in 3D graphics. The majority of PC users still mainly use their computers to use social networks and the web, exchange emails, chat and write the odd letter. If the nearest you regularly come to 3D gaming is the odd game of Bejewelled Blitz, you don't need to spend a fortune on a PC.

Zoostorm Home Media Desktop

The Zoostorm Home Media Desktop is, at £395, a modestly priced mini desktop system. It's not much to look at and it's surprisingly noisy for its size, but it doesn't take up much space, either, so it's easy to unobtrusively stick under a desk or into a corner. The case's interior is bare metal; there are no unfinished edges to cut yourself on but it looks stark and has wide mesh vents that do little to prevent fluff from getting into the case. There are no fans to keep it cool but with only a bare minimum of components, this PC runs little risk of overheating.

The processor is a 2.8GHz AMD FX-4170, plugged into a Gigabyte GA-78LMT-S2P motherboard. The processor's integrated AMD Radeon HD 3000 graphics couldn't handle any of our 3D gaming tests, although it should be able to cope with casual 2D games such as Plants vs Zombies. In our application benchmarks, the system got an overall score of 52. It's nothing to write home about, but should be sufficient for a modest user.

Zoostorm Home Media Desktop

The motherboard is a no-frills model, with just one PCI, one PCI-E x1 and one PCI-E x16 slot. This gives you a modest amount of upgrade potential, but if you want to add a powerful graphics card, you'll have to also upgrade the 350W power supply and add some fans to the case. There are only two memory slots, both of which are occupied by 4GB modules - 8GB is the maximum the motherboard can handle, but it's unlikely you'll need more. There are six SATA ports - none of them SATA3 - of which two are in use for a DVD drive and a 500GB hard disk. The hard disk is surprisingly small by modern standards. There's one empty 5 1/4in drive and three unused 3 1/2in bays, one of which is external so can be fitted with accessories such as a memory card reader.

Read more

Reviews