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HP Pavilion 23-Q110na review - AMD Carrizo hits AIO PC

Michael Passingham
16 Dec 2015
Our Rating 
Price when reviewed 
650
inc VAT

So-so performance and cheap peripherals let down the otherwise reasonable Pavilion 23-Q110na all-in-one

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Specifications

Processor: Quad-core 1.8GHz AMD A10-8700P, RAM: 8GB, Front USB ports : 2x USB, Rear USB ports: 2x USB3, 2x USB3, Total storage: 1TB hard disk, Graphics card: AMD R6 (integrated), Display: Integrated 23in touchscreen, Operating system: Windows 10

All-in-one PCs are a great way to get a complete computer, including peripherals and monitor, without having to clutter your desk with cables. They also offer the distinct advantage of being far larger than a laptop, while taking up around the same desk space. If your laptop never finds itself leaving your desk, an all in one like HP's Pavilion 23 can be a real alternative. It's the first All-in-one we've seen with AMD's new Carrizo APU so we were curious to see how it would perform.

Read our round-up of the best desktops of 2015

The Pavilion 23's 23in, Full HD touchscreen is bright and reasonably colourful, although I didn't find much reason to prod the touchscreen all that often; I treat AIOs like I do a monitor, with my head at least two feet away from the screen. That's quite some distance to stretch just to tap a button I could have easily done with the supplied wireless mouse.

The screen is of a decent quality for a mid-range all-in-one. It's pretty bright, at a little over 224cd/m2, and black levels are nice and low at 0.24cd/m2. Colour coverage is about average at 89% of the sRGB colour gamut. This means the most vibrant colours aren't catered for, and will put off photographers who want to see every colour in their images. Audio was perfectly reasonable; I found both music and speech were clearly relayed from the downward-firing speakers.

The PC itself is a mostly plastic-coated affair, with a large black bezel around the screen. The stand is made from silver plastic, while the back is a textured white plastic. For a mid-range AIO, it's relatively good looking, and you could quite happily have it facing into a room, thanks to a cable routing hole keeping the wires in check. In fact, the only cable you might ever need is the one attached to the power brick. The supplied keyboard and mouse are wireless, although you'll need to occupy one of the USB ports in order to connect them to your PC.

The mouse is far too chunky, without offering any benefits over a smaller mouse; you only get two buttons and a scroll wheel, in a casing that's far too large (and ugly) for my tastes. The keyboard is similarly poor. It's a full-size set, but it's spongey and uncomfortable to type on and picks up dust, dirt and grease unsettlingly quickly.


The majority of the Pavilion 23's USB ports are about as far from accessible as you could imagine, sitting at the rear of the PC, right in the middle

. This makes reaching for them a challenge, and because the bottom of the stand isn't slippery, it takes real effort to spin the machine around. Thankfully, two USB2 ports are slightly more accessible, having been recessed into the underside of the display alongside a 3.5mm audio jack and an SD card reader. If you're plugging in temporary peripherals such as a USB stick or headphones, you won't have to go through the effort of spinning it around - even if it isn't immediately obvious where the ports actually are.

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