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Lenovo laptop model numbers explained 2020: The definitive guide to ThinkPad, Ideapad, Yoga and Legion laptops

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Confused? Here's how to make sense of all of Lenovo’s laptop model numbers – from ThinkPad, to Yoga to Ideapad and MORE

In the market for a new Lenovo laptop, but find yourself stuck on which one to get? Do all those model numbers have you scratching your head? What are the differences between all of the Lenovo lines, anyway? Ponder no longer, because we’re here to help with this handy guide to every single Lenovo laptop model number.

Here at Expert Reviews, we test countless laptops each year and, as such, have had our tech-obsessed hands on nearly every Lenovo laptop under the sun. From heavyweight performance champions to ultraportable hybrids, we've seen them all.

With this experience, we’ll help you identify the differences between a ThinkPad, Ideapad, Yoga and a Legion so that you can decide on the best Lenovo laptop for you, your family, or your business.

READ NEXT: Best Windows, Apple and ChromeOS laptops

Lenovo model numbers explained

Before diving into the models themselves, it’s important to get your head around the various laptop categories – and the distinctions between them. There are actually five lines now, and each one is different.

For starters, there are Ideapads, ultraportable devices for the student on the go. ThinkPads, which tend to be larger and more expensive, are your best bet for sheer horsepower and work performance. Then there's the Yoga lineup, which consists of versatile laptop/tablet hybrids.

Legion is Lenovo’s line of premium gaming laptops – they pack a punch but don’t come cheap. Lastly, there’s a budget line simply named Lenovo, which includes some of its cheapest Chromebook options.

With that out of the way, here's the definitive guide to every Lenovo laptop model number – and what they all mean.

READ NEXT: Best laptops for students

Lenovo model numbers explained: ThinkPad

Lenovo’s ThinkPads are designed for the office. If you need a business-friendly laptop that's designed to last the course and provide good all-around performance and connectivity, then a ThinkPad is a solid, dependable choice.

Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet front

Lenovo’s ThinkPad X1 Carbon has been a mainstay of our best business laptops guide this year, with its unrivalled performance and connectivity options. There’s a whole host of ThinkPad sub-series, which are detailed below.

  • ThinkPad X – These are ultraportable business laptops. Devices such as the recent X1 Carbon are super-slim, while the high-end X1 Extreme offers the ultimate in gaming and computing power, plus a 4K touchscreen with Dolby Vision.
  • ThinkPad T – These are durable, efficient laptops. Sacrificing portability for ruggedness, the flagship T580 is built to survive in extreme environments and has a battery life of up to 27 hours.
  • ThinkPad P – Like the T series, these are mobile workstations, albeit with a bit more power and a slightly higher cost on the whole. The pricey P52 is Lenovo’s first VR-ready certified workstation.
  • ThinkPad E – These are budget devices designed for small businesses, starting from as little as £480. They’re affordable without sacrificing too much on performance.
  • ThinkPad L – Another low-cost option, these laptops range in size from 13in to 15in and should serve you well for on-the-go use.
  • ThinkPad A – The mid-range A series is aimed at professionals looking to perform a variety of editing, open source, and gaming tasks. Devices in this range are powered by AMD Ryzen processors.
  • ThinkPad 13 – The 13 series is designed for classroom use. The only 13in model currently available, the Chromebook 13, is generally bought in bulk by schools and businesses.
  • ThinkPad 11e – The 11e is the budget ThinkPad range, serving as a great choice for a second device or something for the kids. Again, the devices in this range tend to be classroom-oriented.

Lenovo model numbers explained: Ideapad

The Ideapad range of Lenovo laptops is made up of everyday laptops for general use. Performance-wise, they’re not as beefy as the ThinkPads; Ideapads are your go-to for multimedia streaming, web-browsing and the like, as well as offering up a couple gaming alternatives.

Lenovo Ideapad Miix 700 main and pen

You’ll be pleased to learn there aren’t quite so many subcategories as with the ThinkPad. The Ideapad Miix 700 was one of our favourite hybrids when it launched, although it's no longer listed on Lenovo's website.

  • Ideapad 700 – Generally the more expensive of the category, these offer better performance ranging from 13in to 15in models.
  • Ideapad 500 – A bit of a step down from the 700, this is the more affordable middle ground. A typical clamshell laptop range with middling specs, it’s also perfect for the kids.
  • Ideapad 300 – This is the budget Ideapad. With a choice of 17in, 15in and 14in models, these aren’t the greatest in terms of specs but are a solid choice as an inexpensive laptop for students.
  • Ideapad 100 – And finally, the ultra-budget Lenovo laptop, for those that really want to protect their wallet above all else. Starting from £230, their design and performance won’t blow you away, but for basic daily use they’ll see you through.

Lenovo model numbers explained: Yoga

Lenovo’s Yoga brand is all about 2-in-1 hybrids. They are intended for anyone who’s torn between buying a laptop or a tablet. A bit of both is a good thing, and we’ve seen plenty of great hybrids pass through our doors in recent months.

There's only one thing to remember with Lenovo’s Yoga line. The bigger the number, the better the performer. Within each number series are yet more numbers and, again, the bigger they are the more powerful – and expensive – they will be. We managed to get hold of a limited Star Wars edition of the Lenovo Yoga 920; it stormed through our benchmark tests and was a real trooper in terms of battery life too.

  • Yoga 900 –The king of the Yogas. The priciest option, the Yoga 920 Vibes, starts at £1,500 for the base specs. The 910 begins at a more conservative £850.
  • Yoga 700 – Currently there are two versions, the 720 and 730, each of which comes in either 13in or 15in; the larger the screen, the bigger the price tag. The latest Yoga 730 also has Alexa AI on board.
  • Yoga 500 – The Yoga 530 and 510 are available with either Intel or AMD processors. We reviewed the AMD Ryzen Yoga 530 but weren’t too impressed with the CPU performance.
  • Yoga 300 – You want cheap? You’ve got it! The 300 range have mini 11in screens and a super-lightweight design and can be had for as little as £200.

Of course, this line now has a new spin-off in the form of the Lenovo Yoga Book, which sits in a category all of its own. You can read our full review of the Yoga Book C930 here We've also reviewed the new Lenovo Yoga C930, which boasts the first-ever Dolby Atmos soundbar hinge.

Lenovo model numbers explained: Legion

Also known as the Y series, Lenovo Legion is built to meet the requirements of a busy working life at day and a hardcore gaming life at night.

Both the Y530 and Y520 models of the Legion series boast a 15.6in display, discrete Nvidia GeForce graphics (from 1050 to 1060) and up to 512GB PCIe SSD storage.

Another Y series model, the Lenovo Legion Y730, is just around the corner, and it’s set to be the most powerful Legion yet.

Lenovo model numbers explained: Lenovo

Here’s the final category of laptop released by Lenovo to date. What’s it called? Why, Lenovo, of course.

These are largely budget offerings that don’t really fit into any other laptop series and cater mostly to schools and small businesses.

  • Lenovo N – An assortment of Chromebooks and education laptops, some of which are 2-in-1 hybrids. The cheapest, the 100e Chromebook, starts at £230.
  • Lenovo V – 15in and 14in laptops with plenty of storage and a wide array of security features and connectivity options, these are business-minded machines.

And that concludes our guide to the Lenovo model numbers. Rest assured, this list will be updated over time as Lenovo introduces additional models and lines – it’s added two new lines in the past two years, so there’s bound to be more on the way.

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