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BenQ V2410T review

Verdict:

Image quality is unremarkable, but the low power consumption and adjustable stand mean this 24in LED monitor is still a good choice for some.

Review Date: 9 Aug 2010

Price when reviewed: £173

Supplier: http://www.it247.com

Reviewed By: Jim Martin

Our Rating 4 stars out of 5

Although it's billed as a monitor for business use, there's nothing technically different about BenQ's new V2410T compared to other 24in displays we've seen recently. It has the same 1,920x1,080 resolution as virtually every other 22-28in monitor currently on sale, and uses a budget TN LCD panel.

Essentially, this means image quality is average. Some people expect that LED backlighting will increase brightness, contrast and saturation, but we've seen little evidence of this in the LED monitors we've reviewed over the last six months. In fact, the V2410T's quoted brightness is just 250cd/m2, which is lower than many monitors with CCFL (fluorescent) backlights.

The V2410T is by no means bad, though. Apart from being slightly dim, colours are faithfully reproduced and, in Standard mode, it's bright enough to use in any lighting conditions. Contrast is reasonably good - it's easy to see subtly different shades of grey for example - but things go awry at the ends of the spectrum. Dark greys all merge into black and very light greys look no different from whites. This only becomes an issue if you're trying to get the best out of your photos and videos, but you can always use histograms to ensure you don't clip highlights and shadows.

BenQ V2410T

Videos and games play smoothly with no discernable ghosting or juddering - just as we'd expect from a modern LCD screen. As the screen has a matt finish, colours aren't as saturated as glossy screens, but are more natural as a result. Plus, there are virtually no reflections, which is always a bonus.

The matt black bezel isn't reflective either and, while the design may be too plain for some, it's unfussy and not ugly. The screen can be raised by 130mm, and also pivots to portrait mode. This is useful for editing long Word documents, but not much else. It isn't particularly svelte for an LED monitor, but it's certainly frugal in its power consumption, using just 15W in Eco mode and 21W in Standard mode.

You can also choose sRGB, or gaming, photo and movie presets. None of these had the brightness and accurate colours of Standard mode, which we'd recommend sticking to. You'll also have to stick to sitting square-on to the screen as viewing angles are quite restrictive.

If you're after a monitor with a highly flexible stand and don't need the best image quality, the V2410T is a good choice. It'll also be good for your electricity bill, but don't forget that BenQ's 22in G2222HDL has better image quality and costs under £125, as long as you can live with the tilt-only stand.

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