Advertisement
Advertisement

Hannspree SV42LMNB review

Tom Morgan
30 May 2011
Our Rating 
Price when reviewed 
480
inc VAT

A great design can’t disguise the average picture quality, but the SV42LMNB comes in at the right price.

Advertisement

Specifications

42in, Freeview, 1,920x1,080 resolution, 3D: no, 3x HDMI

For this review we tested the 42in model in the SV range, but it's also available in a 32in screen size. Both models have identical specifications except for their dimensions and power usage. We're confident that image quality will be practically identical across both.

As Hannspree’s first LED-backlit TV, the SV42LMNB has been designed to compete with budget 42in sets from more well-established brands - in fact it's the cheapest LED-lit 42in TV we've ever tested. It’s strictly no-frills then, but it does at least have a full HD 1,920x1,080 resolution and an attractive design.

Like most products in the Hannspree range, this TV has a more premium design than the models from its HannsG parent company. This extra attention to detail has paid off, as the glass stand and thin bezel look fairly stylish. The illuminated logo and power buttons are unobtrusive and give the impression of a more expensive set.

Hannspree SV42LMNB

Unsurprisingly for a budget TV, it doesn’t have more advanced features such as Smart TV, DLNA media streaming or even an Ethernet port, but otherwise connectivity is reasonable; three HDMI ports, component and composite video, VGA and coaxial S/PDIF audio can all be found at the back of the set, as well as two SCART sockets for older AV equipment. A single USB port is a welcome addition, letting you connect an external hard disk to play music, video and picture files. It supports most file formats including XviD, but not DivX.

Hannspree SV42LMNB rear ports

Using our Blu-ray of Casino Royale to calibrate the screen, we immediately noticed inconsistencies with the backlight. There was significant bleed in the corners, which refused to go away until we’d lowered the brightness by over a third. The sparse on-screen interface still manages to fill up the majority of the screen, which makes it difficult to tweak settings on the fly; this is made even harder by the limited options. You can tweak brightness, contrast, tint and sharpness, but there are only three pre-set colour control choices. Motion smoothing is also limited to three settings, but even on the lowest produced noticeable edge blur in fast-moving scenes. In spite of these problems, high definition content looked reasonable for a budget panel.

Read more

Reviews