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Intel announces first eight-core processor and unlocked Pentium

James Temperton
20 Mar 2014
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Range of new unlocked processors announced by Intel at Game Developers Conference

Intel has announced Devil’s Canyon, a new unlocked fourth generation Intel Core processor and lifted the lid on its first ever eight-core processor.

The news comes from the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco, where Intel is putting heavy emphasis on overclocking in its raft of announcements.

The Intel Core i7 Processor Extreme Edition is Intel’s first eight-core desktop processor and the first to support DDR4 memory. It’ll be supported by the new Intel X99 chipset with a tentative release set for the second half of the year.

A new fourth-generation processor, codenamed Devil’s Canyon is also set for release later this year with support from the new Intel 9 Series chipset. Intel said the new Haswell processor would be re-engineered for better performance and overclocking.

Intel is also unlocking Pentium for the first time. The Intel Pentium Anniversary Edition will be released towards the middle of 2014 to mark the brand’s 20th birthday. The first unlocked Pentium will be supported by both the Intel 8 and Intel 9 series chipsets and be available towards the middle of 2014.

A glimpse was also given of Intel’s new fifth generation processor. The unlocked fifth gen Core processor for desktop, codenamed Broadwell, will bring Intel Iris Pro Graphics to a desktop socketed unlocked processor for the first time. No date was given for when the fifth gen Intel Core processor will be released.

The company also announced Intel Ready Mode, a new low-power technology that will enable compatible desktop PCs to run on less than 10 watts. In an example Intel said that Ready Mode could sync and store photos from your phone to your computer when you walk in the house.

It requires an Intel Ready Mode enabled desktop PC, compatible motherboard, an Intel processor and only works with Windows 7 and 8. It will also require additional software either from Intel or a third party.

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