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Acer Aspire 5560G review

Tom Morgan
20 Apr 2012
Our Rating 
Price when reviewed 
500
inc VAT

It’s immensely powerful for the price, but is only best suited for certain tasks

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We aren’t quite sure how Acer managed to squeeze a quad-core AMD A8 processor into a £500 laptop, but that’s exactly what it’s done with the Aspire 5560G. It’s a mid-range machine with dedicated graphics that should be capable of playing modern 3D games.

Acer Aspire 5560G

When run in Crossfire with the A8-3500M processor, the Radeon HD 6650M flew through our Dirt 3 benchmark with an average frame rate of 42.1. We could even increase the resolution and still maintain a playable frame rate, so even the latest titles should be playable at high detail settings.

Even if you aren’t looking for a games machine, the 5560G has plenty of other features. It’s easily capable of performing demanding desktop tasks thanks to its 1.5GHz processor and 8GB of RAM. It scored 35 in our video-encoding benchmark, and although it’s slower than an Intel Core i5 chip it’s still more than fast enough to handle everyday applications. There’s also ample storage on which to store your files, thanks to its 750GB hard disk.

Acer Aspire 5560G

Its battery life is fairly reasonable too, considering that it has a dedicated graphics card and quad-core processor inside. The 5560G lasted just over five hours in our light-use test, but this won’t be enough to get you through a full working day, so you’ll need to keep the charger nearby for when you run out of juice.

Once you get beyond its powerful components, the Aspire 5560G is a relatively generic mid-range laptop. Its grey plastic chassis is reasonably sturdy, but there’s slightly more flex in the screen bezel than we like to see. It’s perfectly usable, nonetheless. The keyboard, in particular, is spacious and sensibly laid-out, having a separate numerical keypad and full-size Chiclet style keys that have plenty of bounce.

Acer Aspire 5560G

Sadly, we weren’t overly impressed with its touchpad, mainly because it uses a rocker bar for the mouse buttons. There’s also a significant dead zone at its centre, which means you have to click the edges of the touchpad for your presses to register. Thankfully, it’s still large enough to navigate the desktop comfortably, having a smooth finish that lets your fingers glide across its surface. It also supports multi-touch gestures.

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